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Simon Abrams Forgets Director; Remembers Thor-Loki Kiss in “Dark World”

In response to Simon Abrams’s 654‑word review of Thor: The Dark World on RogerEbert.com 

http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/thor-the-dark-world-2013

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Rogerebert.com has taken a big step back. It’s a strange experience to read a review where the director is never mentioned by the critic, and Simon Abrams accomplishes this feat in “Thor: The Dark World.” The work has its moments, but the analysis is muddled and often bizarre.

The lengthy introduction of Dark World appears to be leading to a big thesis, but Abrams ultimately addresses little more than the charm of Thor. The critic states his argument and essentially stays true throughout the remainder of the review, albeit without addressing the film as a whole.

As noted, the director Alan Taylor is never mentioned in the body of the Dark World, however Abrams does make fair points about plot devices and the flow of the film. Thor’s home, Asgard, is never addressed, but the critic effectively conveys the busy setting. Unfortunately, the work overall feels disconnected.

The character analysis of Dark World is substantial, but substantial with strange thoughts. Abrams hints at a kiss between Thor and Loki, which receives more analysis than Thor’s actual love interest, Jane, played by Natalie Portman.

Statement such as “There are a couple of scenes where characters get to be both important and exciting,” ultimately lead nowhere, and the reader might even believe that they are reading from a junior division of RogerEbert.com. To be fair, Abrams provides rich character analysis, but the writing does little to connect the dots.

Simon Abrams gives a good effort in Dark World, but it all feels a bit awkward.    

Quality of Writing Quality of Argument Spoiler Avoidance Presentation