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Dave White’s “Gravity Review “Has a Turbulent Start but Finishes Smooth

In response to Dave White’s 561‑word review of Gravity on Movies.com 

http://www.movies.com/movie-reviews/gravity-review/dave-white/m68488?pn=1

By Rochus Pomponius, Adjunct Critic

Dave White’s “Gravity Review” starts off like a disaster epic, but finishes in such a manner that its initial lameness is soon forgotten.

When a review starts off listing the immeasurable amount of things wrong with the world, one’s first instinct would be to shut it off and seek another one. There are plenty of reminders of man’s fragility all around. However, if you soldier on past the initial nihilistic soliloquy, you’ll come to realize that White’s write-up is a bit more than mass hysteria baiting propaganda.

From the end of the first paragraph onward the reader is treated to some large notions of what cinema is supposed to do, and the crossroad in which Gravity apparently rests. The writing here is top notch and the piece recovers from the Roland-Emmerich-styled beginning courtesy of White’s gift for prose.

The crtic addresses the fundamental question of how a film can be both a big Hollywood epic, and an actual piece of art. White’s manner of critique is quite convincing; comparing the film to the heavyweights that are 2001: A Space Odyssey  and Solaris.

The spoilers are handled with ease, as there aren’t any this review. The site is decent, though some will call the look a bit outdated. At the very least the ads will not scare away potential readers, as there are only a handful to be found. Those that are present don’t take over your computer like an angry Hal 9000.

This write-up is a solid addition to the legion of Gravity reviews out there already. White’s review is exceptional and  outshines its brethren with the incorporation of  humor that  moves the narrative along in a steadfast manner.    

Quality of Writing Quality of Argument Spoiler Avoidance Presentation

Rochus Pomponius joins the Existimatum staff after a celebrated career as a court jester and the personal entertainer of Emperor Trajan. His studies in rhetoric inform his assessments.