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Amber Wilkinson’s “Ender’s Game” Never Reaches Beyond Its Grasp

In response to Amber Wilkinson’s 604‑word review of Ender’s Game on Eye for Film 

http://eyeforfilm.co.uk/review/enders-game-2013-film-review-by-amber

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The challenge for any reviewer is to find a fresh way to say the same thing everyone else is saying. Or find something new to say.  Amber Wilkinson’s “Ender’s Game” strives for the former, and almost hits the target. But even a near miss is a great shot.

If the review was considered a trilogy, the first in the series would be called “Orson Scott Card: The Extremist Genius Behind Ender’s Game.” Controversy is all well and good, and there is a great impetus to discuss a living author’s views with the work they have created. But in a nice change of pace, Wilkinson takes the much maligned Card’s outbursts and casts them against one of his work’s central themes: compassion wins more battles than prejudice. Her ability to tie this back into the film’s portrayal of the source material is the key to this chapter’s success.

The second installment would be called “Ender’s Game Unleashed!” It concerns the actual film. The plot is outlined, the aliens discussed, and the film’s hero, Ender is seen as hero who is as relevant now as when he was created in 1985. It’s not as ambitious as its predecessor, but it has a certain charm to its functionality.

The final, short installment, “The Last Critique,” offers a consensus opinion on the poor casting of Ben Kingsley and his insane Maori accent, but ends with a note of praise for the film successfully delivering on its own promise. In short, rising above it’s controversies.

Wilkinson’s trilogy is worth reading.    

Quality of Writing Quality of Argument Spoiler Avoidance Presentation