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“Gravity’s Rainbow” by Wesley Morris Is Innovative and Necessary

In response to Wesley Morris’s 1410‑word review of Gravity on Grantland 

http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/9762785/alfonso-cuaron-crazily-good-gravity

By Eugenius Antonius, Senior Critic

Wesley Morris produces a stimulating piece of art with his latest creation,”Gravity‘s Rainbow.”

The critic strays from the common themes of recent reviews, and offers a unique perspective that is not only personal, but poignant.

Rainbow starts off strong with a unique title that will most likely inspire readers to stand and applaud. The choice of words is crisp and evocative of the great beyond. Roy G. Biv will undoubtedly approve.

The opening of Rainbow is a breath of fresh air in the vast land of reviews. Morris tackles the topic of Theater versus iPhone, which is not only intriguing,  but also relevant. The critic has focused his energy, found the sweet spot of exposition and discovered new life in the written word.  

Morris succeeds with his plot summary as well.  At the onset, one will expect nothing else as the paragraphs are constructed magnificently, and the reader will brace themselves for what will be a breathtaking ride. The phrases come together with ease, and Morris injects a light amount of humor which makes for a good read.

Rainbow is essential reading for the thorough approach taken by the critic. The character analysis is rich and extremely satisfying. The beauty of this extravagant composition, however, is the respect shown toward the director.  

The work of Wesley Morris will provoke discussion, and also provides a more than generous amount of information for the casual reader to reflect on.

Rainbow stands alone for its originality, heart and look beyond the norms.    

Quality of Writing Quality of Argument Spoiler Avoidance Presentation

A Roman native, Eugenius Antonius is a decorated scholar and academic. Having graced the School of Athens and the Library of Alexandria, his analytical eye pierces even the most robust film criticism.