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Brian Viner’s “Big Names Don’t Buy Big Thrills” Is a Triumph

In response to Brian Viner’s 290‑word review of The Counselor on Daily Mail [UK] 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2507608/The-Counsellor-review-Big-names-dont-buy-big-thrills.html

By Marcus Julianus, Associate Critic

A near-masterpiece, Brian Viner’s “Big names don’t buy big thrills: Despite boasting the most impressive collection of Hollywood A-listers lacks clout” is sheer joy to read from beginning to end. The author’s talent for succinct and concise argument has never been better. Indeed this might very well be one of his greatest achievements yet.

Viner cuts to the chase with his subject, never wavering for petty details and irrelevant character development. Instead, he hones in on the heart of his prey and delivers the death blow with the skill of a seasoned hunter. He then guts, cooks and presents this gourmet offering for a famished audience to feast on. And a tasty meal it is. The meaty argument savory, but not overpoweringly so—the juicy details filling the reader’s soul with vibrant imagery and pleasant memories.

At times, his approach is abrasive, bordering on excessive, threatening to alienate the audience should he persist further. Thankfully, he never crosses that line. Quite the contrary—he skirts it with the grace of a circus trapeze artist. Even when alluding to the prospect of a normally reticent person becoming homicidal, the result is a charming, whimsical analogy that will no doubt amuse the astute reader.

One should not miss out on Viner’s latest work. To do so would be to deprive oneself the opportunity to peruse one of the most exceptional literature achievements of the day. Few offerings possess such a mighty whallop in such a small package. But don’t let size fool you. This is one package that delivers the goods.    

Quality of Writing Quality of Argument Spoiler Avoidance Presentation

Marcus Julianus was born and raised in Byzantium, where he spent his youth herding goats and making cheese. As a gatekeeper of the review world, Marcus offers his background in poetry and drama to opine on the work of the film critics.