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Sam Woolf’s “Gravity Review” Is a Protracted Missive That Says Too Little

In response to Sam Woolf’s 1150‑word review of Gravity on We Got This Covered 

http://wegotthiscovered.com/movies/gravity-review-tiff-2013/

By Marcus Julianus, Associate Critic

In “Gravity Review [TIFF 2013],” Sam Woolf courts an audience of one in a wearisome love-letter that audiences likely won’t see through to the end.

Gravity Review finds Woolf expounding the virtues of director Alfonso Cuarón’s latest feature without offering much in the way of value to the reader. It’s sadly to be expected of a piece that extols the “love of long takes” as a kind of merit badge.

Like floating adrift in the vast emptiness of space, readers will be looking for any vestige of substance to cling to as this review hurtles on what can only be described as a death mission. Success depends on the dubious prospect of a reader living long enough to make it through.

Poor proofreading leads to “moments of melodrama when the characters have room (and oxygen) to breath [sic],” a notion that, correctly stated, applies to every reader who takes to the challenge of this epic piece.

What’s frustrating is that Woolf is no amateur and clearly has much to offer in terms of imagination and wit. What he lacks is the ability to revise, censor himself when idol-worship contravenes valuable exposition, and keep himself planted to the ground. Off-the-rails would have been refreshing in comparison to having readers lost in space.  

This untethered vessel is simply a love letter to Cuarón. If readers take the chancy move of opening Gravity Review, they’d be advised to read the only part meant for them: the last sentence.    

Quality of Writing Quality of Argument Spoiler Avoidance Presentation

Marcus Julianus was born and raised in Byzantium, where he spent his youth herding goats and making cheese. As a gatekeeper of the review world, Marcus offers his background in poetry and drama to opine on the work of the film critics.