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Passion & Effort Are Taken Hostage in Marc Savlov’s “The Counselor”

In response to Marc Savlov’s 252‑word review of The Counselor on Austin Chronicle 

http://www.austinchronicle.com/calendar/film/2013-10-25/the-counselor/

By Marcus Julianus, Associate Critic

There are some disturbing film reviews that appear to have been written in five minutes, and Marc Savlov’s latest, “The Counselor,” is one of them. The critic writes three vague paragraphs that merely acknowledge that he saw the film, and do little to add to the world of film criticism. It’s not entirely clear what Savlov was hoping to accomplish.

Savlov’s The Counselor has potential, but the passion of the critic appears to have been lost. The introduction is a fascinating read, and the writing is solid, however the work is half over by the time the argument is stated. Why does Savlov give up? One will certainly appreciate the writing acumen of the critic, but also question why anyone should devote time to this review when there is much more substantial work available.

The middle section of Savlov’s The Counselor is a quick summary, and Savlov informs the reader that “awful acts” ensue. The respect for the audience is problematic, and such cryptic statements could be expressed to the reader from any Joe Schmoe who saw the film. Savlov is either completely lazy or has lost a passion for his job.

Savlov concludes The Counselor with a flimsy statement on the performance of Michael Fassbender. How does Savlov feel? Well, the actor “gets the kudos (again)” and that’s it. Do yourself a favor and seek out the hundreds of critics who actually give a little effort and show some enjoyment for their profession.    

Quality of Writing Quality of Argument Spoiler Avoidance Presentation

Marcus Julianus was born and raised in Byzantium, where he spent his youth herding goats and making cheese. As a gatekeeper of the review world, Marcus offers his background in poetry and drama to opine on the work of the film critics.