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Jon Frosch’s Review “Gravity Is Good” Is Good

In response to Jon Frosch’s 651‑word review of Gravity on The Atlantic 

http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2013/08/let-the-oscar-race-begin-i-gravity-i-is-good/279153/

By Eugenius Antonius, Senior Critic

Jon Frosch’s “Let the Oscar Race Begin: Gravity is Good” is good—a decent review in spite of some baffling missteps that keep it from attaining to a higher recommendation.

One of the issues Frosch runs into early on is an abandonment of his strong, interesting promise of white knuckles and terrifying thrills, segueing abruptly into… an outdoor café. Here Frosch relishes the “pleasant bubble” of a seaside festival, meets a mournful French critic, and relates the sad state of journalism in terms of cash-flow.  

Does he want pity, or money? The audience is left to wonder and the scene is never revisited. Instead he cuts to another aside: this a reflection on the movie season, a step closer to relevance in introducing Cuarón, and finally back to Gravity is Good.

Moving forward Gravity is Good indeed becomes a fine jaunt through the thrills of the film, with a fair assessment of objective and subjective perspectives. Frosch deftly intertwines commentary, review, and imagery in a way that the three become inseparable.

There’s no three-act introduction, analysis, and conclusion here: instead, we have a very nice and brisk story that unravels like a scarf taken from the shelf for fall.

An irritating deviation from what may have wrapped nicely is a non-spoiler spoiler, the equivalent of one’s brother saying “I don’t want to ruin it for you, but…”

Some questions need not be asked.

Frosch’s Gravity is Good is good. Unfortunately, its issues just keep it from being good enough.    

Quality of Writing Quality of Argument Spoiler Avoidance Presentation

A Roman native, Eugenius Antonius is a decorated scholar and academic. Having graced the School of Athens and the Library of Alexandria, his analytical eye pierces even the most robust film criticism.