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Drew McWeeny’s “Slick but Miserable’ Is a Work for the People

In response to Drew McWeeny’s 1315‑word review of The Counselor on HitFix 

http://www.hitfix.com/motion-captured/review-ridley-scotts-counselor-makes-slick-but-miserable-use-of-fassbender

By Eugenius Antonius, Senior Critic

Drew McWeeny delivers an outstanding performance in his latest scroller “Review: Ridley Scott’s Counselor makes slick but miserable use of Fassbender.” The critic’s dedication to excellence will be appreciated by the audience, and some might even mistake Banksy street art as a dedication to the critic.

The general reader desires to be moved, and searches the Internet for a review that really means something—a work that hits home. One will find that in Slick but Miserable.

McWeeny doesn’t provide a clear thesis at the beginning of Slick but Miserable, but guess what? That is because the critic provides a monster commentary on the legendary author and screenwriter Cormac McCarthy. The critic refuses to offer just one simple paragraph, but digs deep and produces three in-depth paragraphs for the reader to enjoy. The prose will likely be studied in the future as “The McWeeny-McCarthy Introduction.”

After the lengthy commentary on McCarthy, the critic moves on to address director Ridley Scott, and shows a deep amount of respect by acknowledging his recently diseased brother Tony Scott.

The true joy of Slick but Miserable lies in the beefy analysis of the film. One will already be satisfied by the first half, but McWeeny brings down the house with five paragraphs that are the mark of the pro. The entirety of Slick but Miserable raises the bar, and shows the reader how a real review is written. McWeeny’s offers a true “critique” rather than just a few paragraphs of description that is seen far too often in the review game.

Slick but Miserable is absolutely essential reading. Drew McWeeny breaks down the film with comprehensive takes on the characters and plot, and refuses to be known as one who merely does enough just to get by.    

Quality of Writing Quality of Argument Spoiler Avoidance Presentation

A Roman native, Eugenius Antonius is a decorated scholar and academic. Having graced the School of Athens and the Library of Alexandria, his analytical eye pierces even the most robust film criticism.