Movies  •  Critics  •  About
Existimatum  >  Movies  >  Nebraska  >  Reviews  >  New York Observer

Rex Reed Is the Softest Hostess Twinkie in “American Spirit”

In response to Rex Reed’s 770‑word review of Nebraska on New York Observer 

http://observer.com/2013/11/american-spirit-woe-be-the-fool-who-misses-alexander-paynes-nebraska/

By ,

Rex Reed is a fine craftsman of words in “American Spirit: Woe Be the Fool Who Misses Alexander Payne’s Nebraska,” and his good luck charm is a Hostess Twinkie. The critic shows remarkable attention to his phrasing, and delivers a work that is beefy and mindful of the reader. It’s a gentle giant of a review.

American Spirit is aware of what today’s crazy kids like to enjoy at the talkies, and Reed not only reflects on zombies, but makes a dazzling transition to Bruce Dern winning the Best Actor award at Cannes for Nebraska. It’s a Kubrick-like 2001 cut, and readers will undoubtedly be stunned.

The critic takes time to supply a generous amount of plot summary in American Spirit, and the sparkling writing helps one feel connected with the review. Reed briefly touches on the direction of Alexander Payne, and although the analysis is not too deep, one will find warmth in the quiet reflections. Pleasant thoughts on Phedon Papamichael’s cinematography also add to the special feeling of the review.

American Spirit concludes with a wonderful look at the two leads, and some may argue that it’s like a gymnast nailing the final routine. Reed lets the reader get a sense of who the characters are, and the detailed writing reminds of dust bowl tales and soft twinkies. It’s an experience that all must have at least once in their lives.

Rex Reed’s American Spirit won’t be displayed at the MOMA anytime soon, but it’s a beautiful composition that can be enjoyed over morning coffee.    

Quality of Writing Quality of Argument Spoiler Avoidance Presentation