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Matt Brunson Is All Business in “Split Verdict”

In response to Matt Brunson’s 633‑word review of The Counselor on Creative Loafing 

http://clclt.com/charlotte/the-counselor-split-verdict/Content?oid=3247099

By Marcus Julianus, Associate Critic

Boom. Boom. Pow. Audiences will undoubtedly be led to listen to Black Eyed Peas after experiencing the latest crisp and powerful prose of Matt Brunson in “The Counselor: Split Verdict.” Its not a lengthy work, but the critic brings the critique with a capital C.

One will experience the strange trifecta of being educated, entertained and curious about the vagina of Cameron Diaz in the opening paragraph of Split Verdict.  It’s a powerful introduction that psychologist will surely study for years.

Brunson refrains from the typical conventions of a formulaic review with Split Verdict, and delivers an all out assault of Brunson Brain Bombs from beginning to end. The critic expands on his outstanding intro by transitioning to a broader paragraph on the Coen Brothers and the Stone-like qualities of the film. The use of “duh” is highly troubling, but the beautiful content makes it easy to forget.

Split Verdict acknowledges the titular character with excellent points about the intelligence of Fassbender’s Counselor. One will be pleased to also find a light amount of commentary on the supporting cast, however the critic doesn’t quite allow one to fully understand the characters. The use of “Machiavellian” and “femme fatale” are effective, but just an easy way to maintain the flow of the piece.

Overall, Split Verdict is a nice surprise. Brunson sticks to critique, and his brilliant writing proves that critics don’t need to rely on several paragraphs of summary for each review. It’s a critique, so critique.

Split Verdict is an excellent example of substance over style. Brunson is a fine craftsman of words.    

Quality of Writing Quality of Argument Spoiler Avoidance Presentation

Marcus Julianus was born and raised in Byzantium, where he spent his youth herding goats and making cheese. As a gatekeeper of the review world, Marcus offers his background in poetry and drama to opine on the work of the film critics.