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Andrea Chase’s “GRAVITY” Is a Lot of Fluff With a Little Meat

In response to Andrea Chase’s 639‑word review of Gravity on Killer Movie Reviews 

http://www.killermoviereviews.com/main.php?nextlink=display&dId=1744&subLinks=

By Marcus Julianus, Associate Critic

Andrea Chase’s recent “GRAVITY” takes a long time getting started. Maybe it’s because her paragraphs are so long and thin, but you’ll feel like you’ve been scrolling a long time before things really start picking up.

While Chase herself is quite present at the beginning of the piece, musing aloud about the takeaway messages of the film. As she fades herself out, several long paragraphs take over where analysis takes a backseat to plot description. The prose is injected with the occasional insight, pointing to a creative use of camera angle, or focusing on a particularly strong moment of acting. It isn’t enough though to inject any sense of life into the proceedings. It’s all flat, and generally unimpressive.

While Chase does have some interesting things to say about the Earth as imagery, her writing is too cryptic to work on any real level. She fails to clearly state what it is that she means or how it relates back to the film as a whole.  

In fact, there are moments when the audience will be begin to wonder whether Chase has any answers at all, or if she’s just learned to ask somewhat compelling questions. At one point she writes “and let’s take a moment to acknowledge the allegorical implications of her name,” talking about Sandra Bullock. After giving her audience a chance to catch up to her, she just movies on. “Let’s have a discussion, oh wait, let’s not.” Why not just take a moment and decide not to read this cryptic and thinly constructed piece.    

Quality of Writing Quality of Argument Spoiler Avoidance Presentation

Marcus Julianus was born and raised in Byzantium, where he spent his youth herding goats and making cheese. As a gatekeeper of the review world, Marcus offers his background in poetry and drama to opine on the work of the film critics.