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“‘Hunger Games’…” by Dann Gire a Shock to the System

In response to Dann Gire’s 701‑word review of The Hunger Games: Catching Fire on Daily Herald (IL) 

http://www.dailyherald.com/article/20131118/entlife/711189599/

By ,

“‘Hunger Games’ sequel fired up with catchy characters, political plot” by Dann Gire is a surprisingly abysmal display of incompetence, the likes of which even the most novice of writers are unlikely to emulate.

The first major sign of trouble, one that draws attention like a wounded opposable digit, occurs in the early passages of this tome. The author reveals something about the subject that all but shatters its mystique and tarnishes its allure. This is by far his largest blunder. An aspect that confidential should rarely be disclosed unless absolutely necessary, as doing so significantly diminishes the audience’s motivation to investigate for themselves. In fact, it might even prevent them from reading further.

Should they be capable of overlooking this heinous blunder, they will find themselves mired with trivial details about background elements that have no bearing on the subject. In fact, this embodies a substantial amount of the piece, which make one question why the author felt it so imperative to stress it as prominently as he did. The answer never manifests as he drones on, highlighting one meaningless fun fact after another.

One patient enough to wade through the above eventually reaches the meat of the argument. And due to the mundane, somewhat stoic way that is relayed, they may opt out then if they haven’t already. Despite being comprehensive, albeit slightly too intricate, it is hardly convincing due to the lack of emotional weight it carries. It suggests the author is simply going through the motions, relaying a general overview of the subject, its underlying components and how it should ultimately be viewed by the public—no more, no less. And all of it conveyed with such ho-hum nonchalance, it likely will put the reader to sleep.

  In an interesting coda, Gire demonstrates an inability to learn from past mistakes by repeating his most significant misstep in the waning passages. Not that it matters, as by this point, the audience is likely as tuned out as the author.    

Quality of Writing Quality of Argument Spoiler Avoidance Presentation