Movies  •  Critics  •  About
Existimatum  >  Movies  >  Gravity  >  Reviews  >  amNewYork

Robert Levin’’s “Review: Gravity” Is Solid Despite McDonald’s Appearance

In response to Robert Levin’s 469‑word review of Gravity on amNewYork 

http://www.amny.com/urbanite-1.812039/movie-review-gravity-4-stars-1.6189136

By Marcus Julianus, Associate Critic

Robert Levin’s skillfully written “Movie review: Gravity, 4 stars” is a powerful display of the written word, however one may feel a lack of connection to the character analysis.

To be fair, Levin clearly states, “the less said about the details, the better,” however a complete disregard to one of the leads, George Clooney, will have readers scratching their heads. It’s a common mistake in the Gravity review game, as a critic may not necessarily feel a character is worth discussing at length once they’ve seen the film. The innocent reader seeks information based on trailers and movie posters, and will likely be disappointed by the  lack of commentary on the great Clooney, if due to nothing more than unquenched curiosity.  

At first glance, Levin’s words may feel over the top, however Levin successfully examines individual aspects of the film carefully, and chooses magnetic words to reach his audience. The effect is wonderful, and once readers settle into the elated style, they will be transported to a place where over-the-top feels like the only natural choice.

A key component of Review: Gravity is the critic’s sturdy paragraph on the sound design. The subject is often left untouched by critics, but is important for the overall viewing experience. Most will be deeply moved.

The presentation is questionable. One may feel that McDonald’s is promoting the film, rather than a critic reviewing it. The image selection is solid, however a slight makeover could improve the look.

Review: Gravity is a thorough delight, despite the visual drawback. It’s energy is infectious and Levin gets a lot of mileage out of it.     

Quality of Writing Quality of Argument Spoiler Avoidance Presentation

Marcus Julianus was born and raised in Byzantium, where he spent his youth herding goats and making cheese. As a gatekeeper of the review world, Marcus offers his background in poetry and drama to opine on the work of the film critics.