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Most Is Left to Imagination in Scott Weinberg’s Riveting “Review: Gravity”

In response to Scott Weinberg’s 418‑word review of Gravity on FEARnet 

http://www.fearnet.com/news/review/fearnet-movie-review-gravity

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Some of the most insidious monsters are left unseen, and Scott Weinberg’s “FEARNet Movie Review: Gravity” deftly talks around what’s portrayed as a frightening and visceral experience and leaves it in the shadows, which readers are encouraged to enter if they dare.

The concept works on every level, almost uncannily, in one of the most chilling expository episodes to emerge in this year’s Gravity season. Review: Gravity treats sketches of recapitulation as poisonous and avoids plot obsessively. It’s an intriguing approach, but the skill with which Weinberg embraces it will certainly garner him recognition in the awards season.

This minimalistic masterpiece shouldn’t be mistaken for withholding information or obscuring detail. It’s chock-full of treasures, drawing parallels to similar works, making oblique references to the horror that audiences won’t ever get to see exposed to the comfort and clarity of daylight.  

Review: Gravity‘s stalwart refusal to acquiesce to the spoiler isn’t merely refreshing. It’s downright artful.

The one exception to plot avoidance is afforded at the very conclusion of the piece, and the visual will make audiences’ palms sweat. Where Weinberg’s story ends, another begins—and readers will clamor to the darkness in spite of themselves.

What results is a piece that can only be described as imperative. Review: Gravity creates what similar works four times as long have not been able to: a palpable sense of dread. Appropriate, perhaps, for FEARNet. However, Weinberg’s piece belongs to the minds of audiences, where it will continue to resonate long after they’re finished reading. It is a triumph.    

Quality of Writing Quality of Argument Spoiler Avoidance Presentation