Movies  •  Critics  •  About
Existimatum  >  Movies  >  The Counselor  >  Reviews  >  The New Republic

David Thompson’s “Hollywood Debut” Is Amazing Sans Argument

In response to David Thomson’s 1167‑word review of The Counselor on The New Republic 

http://www.newrepublic.com/article/115317/counselor-review-mccarthys-dialogue-ruins-ridley-scotts-film

By Marcus Julianus, Associate Critic

David Thompson wants you to know how bad The Counselor is, and he’s going to write about everything except why he thinks the film is so bad. One may be reminded of a Cormac McCarthy character who appears on screen to deliver a ten-minute speech, and at the end you say “What?”

David Thompson’s latest work “Cormac McCarthy’s Disastrous Hollywood Debut” is written so unbelievably well that’s it frustrating to see him not address his argument. The critic comes across as a bit self-indulgent because of his failure to get to the facts.

Thompson spends paragraphs on director Ridley Scott, and even transitions to focus briefly on how his personal life affected the shooting of the film. The critic seems lost in his own words, and never addresses the techniques of the director in the film being reviewed. Thompson also gets a little too cutesy with multiple cheetah mentions, and one will wish for him to get to his point.

Based on the full title of Hollywood Debut, and the critic’s long introductory paragraph, one might believe that Thompson will back up his claim with a comprehensive look at the script. However, Thompson spends a couple paragraphs describing the plot while injecting a bit of snark. All if this comes before the Ridley Scott mumbo jumbo.

Hollywood Debut is a fantastic read. It looks great, it flow beautifully and the writing is outstanding. What is Thompson really saying though? The film is bad? 

David Thompson’s Hollywood Debut is an intriguing piece of work, but feels more like creative writing than critique.    

Quality of Writing Quality of Argument Spoiler Avoidance Presentation

Marcus Julianus was born and raised in Byzantium, where he spent his youth herding goats and making cheese. As a gatekeeper of the review world, Marcus offers his background in poetry and drama to opine on the work of the film critics.