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Graham Young’s “Counsellor (15)” Will Lead Connoisseurs to Drink

In response to Graham Young’s 395‑word review of The Counselor on Birmingham Post 

http://www.birminghampost.co.uk/whats-on/film-tv/the-counsellor-movie-review-6307788

By Marcus Julianus, Associate Critic

Graham Young’s latest piece, “Movie Review: The Consellor (15),” is little more than a reminder to the audience that the critic watches movies. The poor crafting shows little effort to blowing the minds of readers, and is more of an observation-review, which could be accomplished by any high school student.

Counsellor (15) opens without a clear statement or argument from the critic. The cast is mentioned by name, but only Bardem is afforded any original thought by the time it’s all over—and even then Young can only manage to reference him as “the stand-out star.” There is absolutely zero character analysis in the review unless you count the critic’s acknowledgement of Bardem’s appearance. It’s a frustrating experience.

What does Michael Fassbender offer as the titular lead character? Young refuses to say in Counsellor (15), and is also unwilling to give the plot any serious thought. Even the actual plot summary is weak, which is a bit more rare. The review connoisseur will surely be highly offended and seek solace in tasty whiskey.

Young waits until the end of Counsellor (15) to produce a tiny bit of analysis on the film. He acknowledges director Ridley Scott’s various international shooting locations, and briefly comments on the dialogue of Cormac McCarthy without saying too much. It’s all brief, boring and vague.

Counsellor (15) shows a supreme lack of commitment to the art of film criticism.    

Quality of Writing Quality of Argument Spoiler Avoidance Presentation

Marcus Julianus was born and raised in Byzantium, where he spent his youth herding goats and making cheese. As a gatekeeper of the review world, Marcus offers his background in poetry and drama to opine on the work of the film critics.