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Ed Gibbs’s “Too Bad for Words” Makes One Ask: “What Is Critique?”

In response to Ed Gibbs’s 355‑word review of The Counselor on The Sun Herald 

http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/movies/the-counselor-review-celebrated-authors-script-too-bad-for-words-20131101-2wmj7.html

By Marcus Julianus, Associate Critic

Ed Gibbs latest work is so dreadful and ironic that one will ask themselves not what Cormac McCarthy was thinking, but what was Ed Gibbs thinking? One will surely break out in laughter at the critic’s weak attempt at criticism. After all—a “critic” does critique, right? “The Counselor review: celebrated author’s script too bad for words” is absolutely too bad for words. It’s hardly film criticism.

Gibbs begins the horrific Too Bad For Words just like almost every other subpar review. Cormac McCarthy? Ridley Scott? Michael Fassbender? What could go wrong? How can the majority of critics resort to this unoriginal open? It’s everything one would expect, and it’s never seen in thorough efforts that actually critique the film.

One of the many unbelievably frustrating aspects of Too Bad For Words is that Gibbs feels the need to use supreme snark while saying nothing original. After a brief whine-fest about the script, the critic proceeds to summarize the film in two very short paragraphs, and then concludes by taking shots at Ridley Scott and Cormac McCarthy. What exactly is Gibbs trying to say about the film? The critic appears to just give up which is the worst type of film criticism (if you can call this mess criticism). Gibbs doesn’t like the film, so he refuses to say anything that could be interpreted as criticism. Unbelievable.

Too Bad For Words is a complete waste of time.    

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Marcus Julianus was born and raised in Byzantium, where he spent his youth herding goats and making cheese. As a gatekeeper of the review world, Marcus offers his background in poetry and drama to opine on the work of the film critics.