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Jackie K. Cooper Is Captain Obvious in “The Counselor”

In response to Jackie K. Cooper’s 418‑word review of The Counselor on jackiekcooper.com 

http://www.jackiekcooper.com

By Eugenius Antonius, Senior Critic

“The acting is good but the movie is bad and good acting in a bad movie is not a recipe for success.” —Jackie K. Cooper

Jackie Cooper makes strong points in his latest work, “The Counselor,” but he never backs up his statements with a substantial commentary. One will undoubtedly understand that Cooper believes the film is bad, but what makes it bad? To the critic’s credit, he touches on the flaws of the dialogue but refuses to engage the reader with deep thoughts a la Jack Handey.

Cooper’s The Counselor may turn some off with its glaring spelling error in the opening sentence. It’s not a critical mistake, but it could have disastrous subliminal effects for aspiring scriptwriters.

The opening paragraph of is catchy and engaging, however it can be found in almost every average review. Cast? McCarthy? Scott? It should be a great film, right? It’s a safe opening, but not quite original.

Cooper doesn’t blame the actors in The Counselor, but he also says little about who they are or how they fit into the film. Who is The Counselor and what makes him tick? Most importantly—why does Jackie Cooper take a shot at innocent Penelope Cruz? “She seems sweet enough but the look in her eyes is a greedy one.” Laugh out loud points for Jackie K. Cooper.

Cooper’s The Counselor is on point with observations, but the work would have been improved with just a little bit more effort and critique. Cooper is undoubtedly a great cinema mind—everyone knows that—but one can’t be blamed for expecting a bit more from JKC.    

Quality of Writing Quality of Argument Spoiler Avoidance Presentation

A Roman native, Eugenius Antonius is a decorated scholar and academic. Having graced the School of Athens and the Library of Alexandria, his analytical eye pierces even the most robust film criticism.